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SURF AND TURF - Fall 2017 Department Newsletter (in PDF format)

GEMS STUDENT HANDBOOK - Download a copy (in PDF format)

ISM STUDENT HANDBOOK - Download a copy (in PDF format)


DEPARTMENT NEWS

Rider mourns the loss of Dean Emeritus Joe Nadeau
Joseph Edward Nadeau, dean emeritus of the College of Liberal Arts, Education, and Sciences and a member of the Rider community for more than 36 years, passed away on June 26, 2015.

Joe came to Rider in 1971 as an assistant professor of geology. He became dean in 1998, a role he excelled in until his retirement in 2008. He taught geology, geochemistry and oceanography while overseeing about 25 programs during his 10 years as dean. Keen to support the professional development of his staff, Joe served as a mentor to his team and was considered a role model for incoming deans. Faculty, staff and particularly students knew him for his easygoing and accessible manner, as well as his passion for education and science.

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Rider in the Galapagos
Students and faculty from GEMS, as well as other departments, traveled to the Galapagos Islands during January 2014 to learn about their geology, ecology, environments, tourism industry, and culture. Learn more about the trip and why these kind of travel experiences are so valuable, educational, and memorable.


LOCK & KEY
Ecologist Dan Hewins ’07 wants to delay climate change by keeping more carbon in the ground and out of the atmosphere.

The grasslands of Alberta lock in carbon like a storage tank. Leave it untouched and the grasslands can sequester carbon in the soil for thousands of years. Disturb it though, such as by a tractor’s plow, and the carbon escapes, increasing the element’s concentration in the atmosphere, which scientists say is a driver of climate change.

Worldwide, similar lands store anywhere from 10 to 30 percent of the world’s organic carbon. Limiting its release can be achieved, says Dan Hewins ’07, a University of Alberta postdoctoral fellow, simply through better agricultural practices. Implementing that change, though, is anything but simple.

With more than 30 miles of fringing and barrier reefs, seagrass beds, mangroves, and rocky limestone shorelines, the Roatan Institute for Marine Science (RIMS), part of Anthony’s Key Resort, offers students the ideal venue for research and for gaining valuable field experience. The GEMS department has cultivated this relationship with RIMS over the past 14 years and is the only college or university in New Jersey to participate in RIMS’s educational programs.

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A SEA OF LEARNING

Sixteen Rider students studied unique tropical marine ecosystems in the Caribbean during a two-week field course offered by the Department of Geological, Environmental, and Marine Sciences.

A sea fan sways rhythmically in the warm, shallow water, appearing to wave to the group of 16 Rider students snorkeling in a coral reef off the coast of Roatan, Honduras. But for all its inherent beauty, this is no vacation. The students are here to study unique tropical marine ecosystems in the Caribbean during a two-week field course offered by Rider’s Geological, Environmental, and Marine Sciences (GEMS) department.

With more than 30 miles of fringing and barrier reefs, seagrass beds, mangroves, and rocky limestone shorelines, the Roatan Institute for Marine Science (RIMS), part of Anthony’s Key Resort, offers students the ideal venue for research and for gaining valuable field experience. The GEMS department has cultivated this relationship with RIMS over the past 14 years and is the only college or university in New Jersey to participate in RIMS’s educational programs.

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GEMS GRADUATE EXPLORES THE OCEAN ON THE NAUTILUS EXPLORATION PROGRAM

Bethany Eden Smith ’05 participated in the Nautilus Exploration Program headed by Dr. Robert Ballard, who is famous for discovering the underwater location of the R.M.S. Titanic in 1985.

Some people grow up dreaming that they’ll be the president of the United States, travel to the moon or, perhaps, explore the world’s oceans in hopes of discovering something amazing.

Well, one Rider alumna is living her dream. Bethany Eden Smith ’05 participated in the Nautilus Exploration Program headed by Dr. Robert Ballard, who is famous for discovering the underwater location of the R.M.S. Titanic in 1985. Smith was among 46 other educators and students chosen from a highly competitive and talented pool of Ocean Exploration Trust (OET) applicants from all over the world.

“The high-quality, hands-on education I received at Rider sparked a hunger in me to know more about our world’s oceans,” said Smith, who graduated from Rider’s Geological, Environmental and Marine Sciences (GEMS) program in 2005. “Our oceans are some of the most unexplored places on our planet, and being able to join Dr. Robert Ballard and this incredible group of scientists, engineers, students and educators aboard E/V Nautilus to explore them is a once in a lifetime experience.”

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Follow-up article: Unraveling a shipwreck's mystery in real time
Bethany Eden Smith ’05 gave a talk at Rider about her experiences exploring a shipwreck