Focusing on how music scholars, performers, educators, journalists and industry professionals can engage the public.

The Past, Present and Future of Public Musicology conference is designed to further research on how music scholars, performers, educators, journalists and industry professionals can engage the public. Speakers include prominent musicologists, ethnomusicologists, museum professionals who work inside and outside academia. Their presentations, lecture-recitals and workshops examine innovative concert programming, collaborations with civic organizations, music in museums, career paths for musicologists outside academia, musical tourism, innovative strategies in music education, and the use of music for social services and disaster recovery.

Delivering the keynote address is Susan Key, Executive Director of the Star-Spangled Music Foundation, an association that was created to celebrate the 200th birthday of the U.S. national anthem. Its educational, performance and archival activities have been featured by The New York Times, the Washington Post, CNN, PBS, C-Span, the Smithsonian, Slate.com, Choral Journal, and many other media outlets. Previously, Ms. Key was Special Projects Director at the San Francisco Symphony, where she worked on a variety of public and media-based initiatives, including Keeping Score and the American Mavericks festivals.  She has additionally developed educational programs for the Los Angeles Philharmonic and the J. Paul Getty Museum. Ms. Key earned a Ph.D. in musicology at the University of Maryland and has taught at the College of William and Mary and Stanford University.

Learn More Online or at 609-921-7100 ext. 8248

Conference Schedule 

Abstracts and biographies for presentions on Friday, January 30
Abstracts and biographies for presentations on Saturday, January 31
Abstracts and biographies for presentations on Sunday, February 1

 

Performers
Ticket Information 

Registration $75
Register Online 

Conference Hotel: Chauncy Conference Center
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