Dr. Mark Promislo Explores Effects of Unethical Work Behavior in New Book, BizEd Article

Dr. Mark Promislo, assistant professor of Management at Rider University, teamed up with Dr. Robert Giacalone, professor of Human Resources Management at Temple University, to explore the effects of unethical work behavior on employees.
Friday, January 11, 2013

Dr. Mark Promislo, assistant professor of Management at Rider University, teamed up with Dr. Robert Giacalone, professor of Human Resources Management at Temple University, to explore the effects of unethical work behavior on employees in their recent book, Handbook of Unethical Work Behavior: Implications for Individual Well-Being, and in their article, “Sick About Unethical Business,” which appears in the January/February issue of BizEd, published by AACSB International.

Unethical behavior has become an increasingly prevalent issue in today’s workplace, according to the authors. Yet, Promislo and Giaclone, found that most research and discussion has focused on the financial and legal ramifications rather than impacts on the well-being of employees.

“For a long time, the effects of unethical behavior at work have largely been focused on monetary and organizational outcomes,” Promislo said. “Not as much research has explored its harmful effects on people.” 

Through a collection of essays by experts from multiple disciplines, the Handbook of Unethical Work Behavior explores a range of organizational misbehaviors — among them, discrimination, abuse, bullying, aggression, violence, fraud and corruption — and their effects on individual and organizational well-being.

“We believe this work has broad appeal to people outside of traditional business avenues,” said Promislo, who spent eight years in market research and sales at Merck & Co.

In their article that appears in January/February issue of BizEd, Promislo and Giaclone describe the importance of educating students how to recognize the many types of unethical behavior in the workplace and its physical and psychological effects on employees.

The authors’ scholarly partnership evolved when Promislo was pursuing his doctorate and working as a graduate assistant with Giacalone at the Fox School of Business at Temple. Their research has also appeared in the Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, Journal of Business Ethics, and Business Ethics: A European Review.

Promislo, who joined the Rider faculty in 2010, holds a Ph.D. in Human Resources from Temple University, an M.B.A. in Marketing from Northwestern University and a bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Tulane University.

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