Rider Theater Presents The Importance of Being Earnest

Oscar Wilde’s classic comedy of high manners, low morals and multiple Ernest
Wednesday, April 6, 2011

Beginning Thursday April 14, Rider University’s Theater program will present seven performances of The Importance of Being Earnest, one of Oscar Wilde’s most famous plays, in the Spitz Studio Theater on Rider University’s campus in Lawrenceville.

Preview performances will be Thursday, April 14 at 7 p.m. and Friday, April 15 at 7 p.m.  Additionally, five performances will be presented on Saturday, April 16 at 8 p.m.; Wednesday April 20 through Friday April 22 at 8 p.m.; and Saturday, April 23 at 2 p.m.

Oscar Wilde’s classic comedy of high manners, low morals and multiple Ernests follows the tangled web of Jack, a country bachelor who uses the name Ernest in the city, giving him license to frolic anonymously, and his friend Algernon, who seeks amour by becoming Ernest in the country. Jack proposes to Gwendolyn while Algernon, posing as Jack’s wicked brother Ernest, falls in love with Jack’s ward, Cecily. The Importance of Being Earnest is an evening of high camp, high fashion and acres of droll snobbery.

Director Patrick Chmel is professor emeritus and adjunct professor of theater at Rider. Dr. Chmel worked on Broadway before joining the Rider faculty. Many of his Rider productions, including The Elephant Man, Urinetown, Proof and Cabaret, were selected as the year’s ten top productions by the Princeton Packet newspaper group. He has been published in many national publications, including the prestigious Theatre Journal

Two preview performances will be held on Thursday, April 14 at 7 p.m. and Friday, April 15 at 7 p.m. Preview tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for students and seniors.  Additionally, five performances will be held on Saturday, April 16 at 8 p.m.; Wednesday April 20 through Friday April 22 at 8 p.m.; and Saturday, April 23 at 2 p.m.  Tickets are $20 for adults and $10 for students and seniors.

To purchase tickets call the box Office at 609-896-5303.

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