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Daria Cohen
Chair, Languages, Literatures and Cultures, Associate Professor of Spanish
Fine Arts 383

Daria Cohen received her Ph.D. in Spanish from Rutgers University. Her dissertation analyzed the burgeoning subjectivity of the female body in short prose narratives by canonical authors from both Spain and Latin America in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Dr. Cohen’s research interests include the Hispanic modernist short story, theater, subjectivity, narratology, gender studies, pop culture and foreign language pedagogy.

Hernán Fontanet
Professor of Spanish
Fine Arts 367

Education

  • Doctor of Philosophy in Spanish with concentration in Latin American Literature (with honors), Doctor en Filosofía y Letras (cum laude). Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain 2003.
  • Master of Arts in Literature with concentration in Spanish Literature, Filólogo Hispánico. Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain 1998.
  • Bachelor of Arts in Literature with concentration in Hispanic Literature, Licenciado en Letras. Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina 1994.

Publications – Books

Linda Materna
Professor Emeritus of Spanish
Fine Arts 385

Linda Materna is Professor of Spanish and Director of the Rider Center for International Education. She received her Ph.D. in Spanish from The University of Wisconsin-Madison. Dr. Materna’s research includes feminist re-readings of Spanish Romantic theater, studies on the theater of the Generation of 1927, and analyses of contemporary Spanish theater and film.

Stéphane Natan
Professor of French
Fine Arts 366

Stéphane Natan is Assistant Professor of the Department of Languages, Literatures & Cultures and Professor of French. He was raised and educated in France, where he received his college education. He has four different degrees: one in French Language and Literature, one in Classics, one in Philosophy, and one in Armenian Language. Specializing in seventeenth-century French literature, he received a PhD with distinction from the University Jean Moulin of Lyon in April 2003 with a dissertation on Pascal and his rhetoric.

Mary Poteau-Tralie
Professor of French
Fine Arts 364

Mary Poteau-Tralie received her Ph.D. in Romance Languages and Literatures from Princeton University. Dr. Poteau-Tralie’s research includes 19th century Realist/Naturalist prose fiction, specifically the short stories of Guy de Maupassant. More recently, she has presented papers and published articles and reviews on francophone literature, including works by Assia Djebar and Maryse Condé. Dr. Poteau-Tralie served as Chairperson of the Department from 2008 – 2012. In addition to courses in French language, literature, composition and translation, film, business and culture, Dr.

Margaret Schleissner
Professor of German
Fine Arts 352

Margaret Schleissner received her Ph.D. in German from Princeton University. Her dissertation was a critical edition of a fifteenth century treatise on women’s medicine. She has taught at the University of Southern California, at Rutgers University, and Haverford College. She participated twice in the Fulbright German Studies Seminars, and has been a visiting scholar at the Institute for the History of Medicine at the University of Würzburg, Germany, with support from DAAD and the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft. Professor Schleissner was general editor of the Medieval Feminist Newsletter.

Maria Villalobos-Buehner
Associate Professor of Spanish
Fine Arts 354

María Fernanda Villalobos-Buehner received her Ph.D. in Higher, Adult, and Lifelong Education from Michigan State University. Her dissertation explored the effect of study abroad programs in the development of a second language identity and second language learning motivation. Dr. Villalobos-Buehner research interests include foreign language pedagogy, the adult language learner, second language acquisition, language learning motivation, the role of technology in language learning, and study abroad programs and their influence in language learning.

Associate Professor of Russian

Robert Winter received his Ph.D. in Russian language and literature from Columbia University. His dissertation dealt with the nineteenth century writer and memoirist Alexander Herzen. Professor Winter has taught many courses in the Baccalaureate Honors Program: Love in the Western World, Existentialism in Literature and Philosophy, Literature and Politics, and most recently, the nineteenth century Historical Novel. He has also pioneered several interdisciplinary courses: Masterworks of Western Literature, the European Folktale, the European Novella, and the Bible as Literature.

Shunzhu Wang
Professor of Chinese
FA 368

Education

  • 1994 --2001: Ph. D., Comparative Literature, Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, Purdue University. West Lafayette, IN 47904, U.S.A. Areas of study: Classical Chinese Literature; Modern Chinese Literature; Modern American Literature; Critical Theory.
  • 1992--1994: M. A., English Education, Humanities Division, Wayne State College. Wayne, NE 68787, U.S.A.
  • 1982--1983: Diploma, Jiangsu College of Education, English Department, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, P. R. China.