Liberal Studies for Adult Students

The Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies enables students, through a variety of learning experiences to consider humankind in the contem­porary world. The curriculum provides for skill development and exposes students to bodies of knowledge shared by edu­­cated persons. Offered for adult students enrolled in the College of Continuing Studies, the program provides an opportunity for students to share common learning experiences and to develop personal plans of study for career advancement, personal growth, and graduate study.

The program consists of five major learning areas:

1. The Liberal Studies Core            3-6 credits
2. The Basic Core                       15 credits
3. The Areas of Knowledge        36-39 credits
4. The Concentration                       36 credits
5. The Free Electives                  30-33 credits

Liberal Studies Core

The Liberal Studies Core consists of two courses: LIB 200-Introduction to Liberal Studies, and LIB 400-Seminar in Liberal Studies. The first directs students to examine the liberal arts in the historical perspective. This course considers the structure of knowledge and liberal education as it evolved historically and surveys the different ways of knowing. The second, taken during the final two semesters prior to graduation, encourages students to examine a variable set of permanent problems in humanistic debate and learning, related to the University Theme, emphasizing the nature of critical thinking. Through a seminar approach, the course provides an opportunity for students to relate the humanistic values of the liberal tradition to the ever changing society in which they live.

Students who transfer in 30 or more liberal arts and science credits are not required to complete the first course, LIB 200 (Introduction to Liberal Studies). These students will complete an additional free elective (3 credits).

Basic Core

Rider Course Title Rider Course Number Credits
Expository Writing CMP-120 3
Research Writing CMP-125 3
Speech Communication COM-104 3
Math Requirement Choose from a selection of courses 3
Information Technology CIS-185 3

Area of Knowledge

The Areas of Knowledge provide exposure to four broad areas of knowledge with which the educated person should be conversant. Students should select three courses in the Historical Perspective, three in the Artistic and Intellectual Perspective, three in the Contemporary Perspective, and two in the Natural World. No more than three courses from any one discipline may be used to meet the Areas of Knowledge requirements. At least two disciplines must be represented within each Area of Knowledge. Students must consult with their CCS advisor before sselecting courses for the Areas of Knowledge to ensure that courses chosen meet specific area requirements. 

Area of Knowledge: Historical Perspective

To comprehend the contemporary world, one must appreciate that it is the result of historical evolution, and that this process of change continues today. Our society should not be understood as rigid or absolute but as part of an historical continuum. Courses taken to fulfill this requirement represent a variety of disciplines. Designated courses from the following disciplines may be used to meet this requirement.

Students choose 3 courses:

American Studies
English
Literature

Fine Arts
Global/Multinational Studies
History
Philosophy
Political Science
Sociology
Spanish

Area of Knowledge: Artistic and Intellectual Perspective

Intellectual creativity is an ability which is unique to humans. Humans alone have produced works of art and developed systematic bodies of thought. Thus, to understand humans, contemporary or otherwise, is to know them in this special role. Courses taken to fulfill this requirement should focus on artistic and intellectual achievements as they are represented in a number of disciplines. Designated courses from the following disciplines may be used to meet this requirement.

Students choose 3 courses:

American Studies
Economics
English Literature
Fine Arts
Gender & Sexuality Studies
History
Law and Justice
Literature
Philosophy
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology

 

Area of Knowledge: Contemporary Perspective

To understand daily lives in the modern world, one must understand the dynamics of modern society and the forces that influence the course of living and working in the world. Courses taken to meet this requirement should reflect the varied aspects of life in contemporary society. Designated courses from the following disciplines may be used to meet this requirement.

Students choose 3 courses:

American Studies
Communication
Economics
Fine Arts
Global & Multinational Studies
Gender & Sexuality Studies
History
Law and Justice
Literature and Foreign Culture
Multicultural Studies
Philosophy
Poltical Science
Sociology

Area of Knowledge: Natural World

This area represents recognition of the impact of the natural world on humans and their behavior. Conversely, it also examines the increasing impact of the technological society on the natural world. Designated courses from the following disciplines may be used to meet this requirement.

Students choose 2 courses:

Biochemistry
Biology
Behavorial Neuroscience
Chemistry
Geological, Environmental, and Marine Science
Physics
Psychology
Sociology

Concentration Area

The Concentrations are multidisciplinary and acknowledge the personal interest and professional objectives of adult students. To provide sufficient cohesion among the courses in the concentration, courses contributing to the concentration must be selected from within one of four groupings. In addition, to accommodate needs and interests not served by one of the concentration areas, students may propose concentrations of individual design. The proposals must be approved by a faculty committee on individual study, and a CCS advisor.

Concentration Area Students choose one of the following concentration areas:

Rider Discipline Credits
Humanities
Social Science
Applied Social Science
Law and Justice
Global Studies
Natural Science

The multidisciplinary concentrations acknowledge the personal interest and professional objective of adult students. Students may also propose concentrations of individual design (to be approved by the Dean of the College and faculty committee on individual study). Emphasis in Business or Health Adminstration may also be included in certain concentration areas.
36

Elective Courses

  Credits
Free elective credit hours may be taken in any department within the University, subject to the program limit of 30 credits from outside the liberal arts and sciences. Students are encouraged to pursue minors. 30-33

A candidate for graduation must complete a minimum of 120 acceptable credits. Of the required 120 credits, 36 must be in upper-level courses as determined by the respective departments, including three credits from the liberal studies core and 18 from the concentration. A maximum of 30 credits from outside the liberal arts and sciences may be presented for graduation.